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Tacoma 2025

Tacoma's Strategic Plan

Tacoma 2025 represents our community’s vision for Tacoma’s future. With defined indicators and other ways to measure progress, it is a plan that guides where the City of Tacoma – as both a local government organization and a community – is going over the next 10 years. It is also a plan that helps us direct our efforts and resources in ways that reflect our growing community’s evolving needs. 

Collaborating with the community, neighboring jurisdictions and other partners regionally, nationally and internationally, the City works hard every day to ensure that the vision of Tacoma 2025 is being implemented in a way that improves the quality of life for everyone who lives, learns, works, and plays in Tacoma. 

On January 27, 2015, the City Council approved Resolution 39016: A Resolution approving the City of Tacoma's Ten-Year Citywide Strategic Plan and Vision, Tacoma 2025; and establishing the Tacoma 2025 Advisory Committee, to consist of 11 members to be appointed by the Mayor.

Five Key Focus Areas 

Based on the strategic planning process and final Strategic Plan document, community priorities were synthesized by the Tacoma 2025 Advisory Committee into five key focus areas: 

 

Livability

Livability icon

 

Tacoma residents have opportunities and amenities such as connected neighborhoods, accessible and efficient transportation options, and vibrant arts and culture while maintaining affordability.

Livability Indictators

  • Improve access and proximity by residents to diverse income levels and race/ethnicity to community facilities, services, infrastructure, and employment.
  • Increase the number of Complete Compact Communities/ 20-Minute Neighborhoods throughout the city.
  • Improve health outcomes and reduce disparities, in alignment with the community health needs assessment and CHIP, for all Tacoma residents.
  • Decrease the percentage of individuals who are spending more than 45% of income on housing and transportation costs.
  • Increase positive public perception of safety and overall quality of life. 

Economy/Workforce

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Tacoma Residents can find livable wage jobs in key industry areas. Tacoma will be a place of choice for employers, professionals and new graduates.

Economy/Workforce Indicators

  • Increase the number of diverse livable wage jobs.
  • Increase the number of Tacoma households that have livable wage jobs within proximity to the city.
  • Increase the number of infrastructure projects and improvements that support existing and new business developments.
  • Increase the availability of industry-specific education programs to support identified growth sectors. 
  • Increase the percentage of people relocating to the city and affordability of housing compared to neighboring jurisdictions.
  • Decrease the number of vacant properties downtown and in the neighborhood business districts.
  • Increase positive public perception related to the Tacoma economy.  

Education 

Education icon

 

Tacoma leads the region in education for youth and adults by producing more graduates from high school and college, linking residents to employment in the region, and investing in lifelong learning opportunities.

 

Education Indicators

  • Increase the availability and accessibility of early childhood education programs. 
  • All students will graduate from high school and be prepared to enter the workforce or pursue post-secondary education.
  • Increase the number of quality out of school time learning opportunities distributed equitably across the city. 
  • Demonstrate community support for education by increasing support for school levies and bonds; volunteering and mentoring youth. 
  • Increase the number of college students that find employment and remain in Tacoma after post-secondary completion.
  • Increase digital access and equity across the city. 
  • Increase the number of adults with post-secondary degrees or certifications.
  • Increase school choice options.  

Civic Engagement 

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Tacoma residents are engaged participants in making Tacoma a well-run city.  Elected and volunteer leadership of the city reflects the diversity of the city and residents fully participate in community decision making.

Civic Engagement Indicators

  • Increase the number of residents who participate civically through volunteering and voting. 
  • Elected officials, boards, commissions, and volunteer leadership will reflect the diversity of the Tacoma community. 
  • Increase the percentage of residents who believe they are able to have a positive impact on the community and express trust in the public institutions in Tacoma. 
  • Representation at public meetings will reflect the diversity of the Tacoma community. 

Equity and Accessibility 

Equity and accessibility icon

 

All residents are treated equitably and have access to services, facilities and financial stability.

Equity and Accessibility Indicators

  • Improve access and proximity by residents to diverse income levels and race/ethnicity to community facilities, services, infrastructure, and employment. 
  • All students will graduate from high school and be prepared to enter the workforce or pursue post-secondary education.
  • Increase the number of quality out of school time learning opportunities distributed equitably across the city. 
  • Decrease the percentage of individuals who are spending more than 45% of income on housing and transportation costs. 
  • Elected officials, boards, commissions, and volunteer leadership will reflect the diversity of the Tacoma community. 
  • Increase digital access and equity across the city. 
  • Representation at public meetings will reflect the diversity of the Tacoma community. 
  • Increase the number of Tacoma households that have livable wage jobs within proximity to the city. 

 

Tacoma 2025 in Action

Tacoma 2025 GoalsSetting the strategy for the entire city, Tacoma 2025 is being incorporated into every major planning process, including the OneTacoma plan, the Environmental Services Strategic Plan, the Affordable Housing Action Strategy, and the City budget process. 
 
The One Tacoma plan guides decisions on land use, transportation, housing, capital facilities, parks and the environment, sets standards for roads and other infrastructure, identifies how they will be paid for, and establishes the basis for zoning and development regulations.  

Another example of a strategic plan that incorporates the key focus areas outlined in Tacoma 2025 is the Environmental Services Strategic Plan, which will guide the City’s Environmental Services Department in its decision-making as they work to support healthy neighborhoods and a thriving Puget Sound in Tacoma.

The City’s Affordable Housing Action Strategy, which was recently developed as an urgent response to a changing housing market that is increasing displacement pressure for residents and a widespread need for high-quality, affordable housing opportunities for all, also incorporates the key focus areas outlined in Tacoma 2025.

During the City’s 2019-2020 Biennial Budget planning process, every City department also incorporated goals relating to the key focus areas outlined in Tacoma 2025 into their 10-year and two-year goals, and they report on these goals quarterly. Learn more about how each Department is contributing to achieving the 2025 goals in the City’s 2019-2020 biennial budget.

View the Original Tacoma 2025 Plan

Get Involved

We can only accomplish the vision of Tacoma 2025 by working together across communities, organizations, and sectors. By aligning our collective efforts to the goals of 2025, we can accomplish incredible things and bring our vision for Tacoma to life.

 

For organizations working in Tacoma, we want to know how your work aligns and contributes to Tacoma 2025, including any specific indicators your organization is working on. By aligning efforts, we hope to support programs and resources to make us all more strategic and effective at improving the quality of life here in Tacoma. Understanding and aligning tracking and measurement of the work that is happening is also vital in order to understand whether we are meeting our targets as a community. Contact Jacques Colon, Tacoma 2025 Strategic Manager, to learn more about how we can work together to achieve our community vision. 

  

Partners

Here are some of the many partners and participants that are working together to make this a reality.

 

List of Partners and Participants

  • Arts community
  • Bates Technical College
  • Boys & Girls Club 
  • CHI Franciscan 
  • Citizen Committees, Boards, and Commissions
  • Community Clinic Network 
  • Community mobilization & youth partners 
  • Economic Development Board 
  • Executive Council for a Greater Tacoma 
  • Faith communities 
  • Foundation for Tacoma Students
  • Greater Tacoma Community Foundation
  • Joint Base Lewis–McChord 
  • Kaiser Permanente
  • Labor Unions 
  • MultiCare Health System
  • Pierce County 
  • Pierce Transit 
  • Port of Tacoma 
  • Tacoma business improvement area
  • Tacoma Community College
  • Tacoma Housing Authority 
  • Tacoma Metro Parks 
  • Tacoma Public Library 
  • Tacoma Public Utilities 
  • Tacoma Regional Convention and Visitor’s Bureau
  • Tacoma School District
  • Tacoma-Pierce County Chamber of Commerce
  • Tacoma–Pierce County Health Department
  • University of the Puget Sound
  • University of Washington at Tacoma (UWT)
  • Workforce Central
  • World Trade Center of Tacoma 
  • YMCA
  • YWCA
  • And many more! 

 

For community members, your continued involvement in local processes and projects is critical to making the city work as well as possible for you. In addition to volunteering on local commissions or neighborhood councils, voting, and participating in city council meetings, we also want to hear what is most important to you and what you would like to see happen to address those priorities. View the Tacoma 2025 flyer and tell us what you think by emailing jcolon@cityoftacoma.org